Advanced Watercolor

Ms. Joyce Riley, Art Teacher

Advanced Watercolor

Overview of the Course:

Juniors and seniors who have completed a 2-year foundation course in drawing, design and painting, may take this double period elective course. Students will explore different watercolor techniques and discover which suit them best. Students will explore color palettes and methods in artists’ works and explore recommended museums, galleries and websites featuring watercolor painters. Students will create and maintain an artist website in WordPress to show completed paintings and works in progress. By the end of the course, students will have strengthened their practice in watercolor technique, discovered a personal style in watercolor painting and be able to discuss their work as a developing painter. At the end of the course, students will give a presentation of their website and most successful work.

Course meets all the NYS Standards:

Standard 1:           Creating, Performing, and Participating in The Arts

Standard 2:           Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources

Standard 3:           Responding To and Analyzing Works of Art

Standard 4:           Understanding the Cultural Dimensions and Contributions of the Arts

Goals of the Course:

Students will improve ability to handle and control brushwork and watercolor paints.
Students will experiment with various techniques and styles of the medium.
Students will become adept in choosing a color palette.
Students will express feeling and personal voice in watercolor painting.

Objectives:

By the end of the semester students will be able to:

  • Create a sketch and color palette outside of class in order to complete a final painting in class.
  • Discuss and analyze their personal work and the work of others.
  • Create a color mood in a painting.
  • Experiment with different painting techniques and be able to explain the advantages and characteristics of each approach.
  • Present paintings that are of portfolio quality.
  • Create and maintain an artist website and online portfolio.

 

Supplies:

Students may find that they already have many of the materials leftover from SP2 water based painting.

Paint:   Cadmium Yellow Light Hue, Cadmium Red Medium Hue, Yellow Ochre, Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna, Ultramarine, Hooker’s Green.

Optional paint: Cobalt Blue, Indigo Hue, Permanent Rose, White Gouache

Watercolor brushes, approximate sizes: Flat ¾” or 1″ ; Round ⅛” or ¼”; and small pointed brush for fine detail. Synthetic bristle is the least expensive.

Watercolor palette: approximately 12″ x 16″ palette that is white, has wells, and has room to mix colors.

Sponge: Cellulose for wiping brushes

Pencil:  F, or “watercolor pencil”

Paper: 14″ x 17″ Watercolor block or pad / optional 3-5 sheets of larger watercolor paper

Miscellaneous: paper towels, art box, or shoe box for materials, eraser, tissues, a large plastic container (16 – 32 oz.), a ruler, Kraft paper tape,
miscellaneous tools for mark-making: a toothbrush, an old MetroCard, thin cardboard strips, etc.

Requirements of the Course:

  • All projects, homework and classroom assignments must be completed on time.
  • Attend class regularly and punctually.
  • Presentation of work at various points of the semester.
  • Maintain an artist website in WordPress to show completed watercolor paintings as well as the progress of each painting. Click here for Parent Permission Slip for WordPress
  • Visit a NYC museum or gallery and prepare a written report with an analysis of the art.
  • Complete a Common Core writing assignment that may be a component of the museum report.

Required Assignments:

Create a series of works based on your personal interests, your culture, your mark-making, etc.
Here are a few ideas:

  • A series of works that begins with representational interpretations and evolves into abstraction.
  • A series of landscapes based upon personal experience of a particular place in which composition and light are used to intensify artistic expression.
  • Abstractions developed from cells and other microscopic images
  • Interpretive portraiture or figure studies that emphasize dramatic composition or abstraction
  • A personal or family history communicated through symbols or imagery
  • A series of expressive landscapes based upon personal experience of a particular place
  • A personal or family history communicated through the content and style of still-life images
  • Abstractions from mechanical objects that explore mark-making
  • Interpretive self-portraiture and figure studies that emphasize exaggeration and distortion
  • A project that explores interior or exterior architectural space, emphasizing
    principles of perspective, structure, ambiance created by light, etc.
  • An interpretive study of literary characters in which mixed media, color and form are explored
  • The use of multiple images to create works that reflect psychological or narrative events

 

See great examples of watercolor online:

Watercolor Demo Videos

google image search Winslow Homer watercolors

google image search John Singer Sargent watercolors

http://watercolorart.com/

http://ebaddeley.com/

http://www.sashaprood.com/

http://jensineeckwall.com/

http://www.wroberts.com.au/html/watercolors.html

http://portfolios.sva.edu/hanaroda

http://heidisandecki.com/?cat=4

Watercolor portraits 1

 

Key Vocabulary and Techniques

Tint, tone, hue, contrast, still life, warm and cool colors, primary/secondary/complementary/analogous and tertiary colors, value, composition, horizon line, flat and graded washes, masking and wet and dry brush techniques.

 

Electronics Policy:

Only During Work Periods – You may listen to music quietly (only YOU should hear your music)

NO TEXTING! NO EMAILING!  NO BROWSING!   NO TALKING ON THE PHONE! NO USING YOUR PHONE AS A REFERENCE! PRINT YOUR REFERENCES!

Please DO NOT have your phone out when I or someone else is addressing the class

**Please respect the fact that these are the rules for this class and other teachers will have difference policies.

 

Noise Policy:

Sometimes we have a need for a silent studio and other times a collaborative studio.  During a silent studio we need to have silence so all can concentrate (if you are talking, your focus is not on your work).  During a collaborative studio, there is a need for getting feedback from your peers.

 

Due Dates for projects:

All projects will be due one week after the new project is started.  This allows time for the student to finish the project on their own time.

*Late projects will be accepted for 50% credit.  No late work will be accepted after the marking period.

 

Reworking your project after it’s been graded

After your project has been turned in and graded you will receive a rubric with your broken down grade.  If you are not satisfied with the grade, you may rework the project (or do it over) and turn it in to be re-graded.  You must turn the project in with the original grade sheet.

 

Lateness for class:

You are expected to get to class on time.  For every unexcused lateness, I will take a point off of your grade.

Excused lateness:  If you were talking to a teacher, please get a pass from that teacher.  I will not mark points off for excused lateness.

*Please sign the late book quietly with name, time and reason you were late.

 

Grading Policy

MOST OF THE WORK WE DO THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER REQUIRES A LOT OF PARTICIPATION.  Therefore much of your final grade will be based on class participation.  A STUDENT’S FINAL GRADE IS BASED ON THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

40% Class participation/class work/projects
30% Exams, quizzes, and studio assessments
20% Class preparation and homework
10% Reports

 

CLASS PARTICIPATION & PROJECTS                                                          40%

  • ATTENDS CLASS REGULARLY & ON TIME
  • FOLLOWS DIRECTIONS AND CLASS RULES
  • COMPLETES PROJECTS ON TIME
  • RESPECTFUL TO TEACHER, FELLOW STUDENTS AND SELF
  • MAKES PRODUCTIVE USE OF CLASS TIME
  • PARTICIPATES IN ACTIVITIES AND DISCUSSIONS
  • SHARES IN CLEAN-UP ACTIVITIES
  • GIVES BEST EFFORT

 

EXAMS & STUDIO ASSESSMENTS                                                      30%

  • ORIGINALITY
  • CREATIVITY
  • EFFORT TO CHALLENGE ABILITIES
  • CORRECT USAGE OF ART MATERIALS AND TOOLS
  • EXECUTION OF CONCEPTS
  • UNDERSTANDS THE PROCESS OF THE TECHNIQUE
  • FOLLOWS THE DIRECTIONS OF THE PROJECT
  • OVERALL PRESENTATION OF THE WORK

 

CLASS PREPAREDNESS / SKETCHBOOK / HOMEWORK                                            20%

  • STUDENTS SHOULD FILL THEIR SUPPLY LIST THE FIRST WEEK OF SCHOOL,

AS WELL AS ANY ADDITIONAL SUPPLIES NEEDED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER.

  • EACH STUDENT SHOULD HAVE THEIR SKETCHBOOK or NOTEBOOK IN CLASS WITH THEM DAILY.
  • UPON ARRIVAL TO CLASS, READ THE AIM, DO NOW AND HOMEWORK. DO WHATEVER THE “DO NOW” ASKS YOU TO DO. When we start student presentations, everyone is expected to gather around the smart-board at the beginning of class

 

NYC MUSEUM / GALLERY REPORT                                                                               10%

 

Remember:  Someone else wanted your place at LaGuardia.  You are here to work hard and become your best.  We will show you how to learn, you must do the rest.  100% effort.  NO EXCUSES!

Never hesitate to ask a question.  I want you to succeed.  I am open to all suggestions.  Let’s have a great year!     Thank you!  Ms Riley